Andy Warhol, dead 30 years, anticipated our times. He celebrated commercialism, celebrity, and had an opinion of Donald Trump: "I think Trump's sort of cheap"... more »

Robert Lowell’s herculean strength of character. After each of 16 shame-filled, soul-killing episodes of insanity, he sought to re-establish his life... more »

We are “unique, irreplaceable" says the humanist. We contain multitudes, says the scientist — bounded by the narrow confines of our skulls... more »

The idea of intelligence has justified slavery, oppression, eugenics. No wonder the prospect of artificial intelligence fills us with dread... more »

How to stage a ballet in Soviet Russia. Avoid not only technical kinks but also ideological defects, which Sergei Prokofiev was unable -- or unwilling -- to do... more »

Veneration of Shakespeare blinds us to the brilliance of other writers, to the other ways a play can and should be. The case against Shakespeare as a lone genius... more »

In the mid-60s, Norman Podhoretz gave up on becoming the next Lionel Trilling. Instead he wrote about ambition, alienating almost everyone he knew... more »

Norman Mailer helped free the convicted murderer Jack Henry Abbott, promising him work as his literary assistant. Shortly after Abbott’s release, he killed again... more »

How to make the color red: Scholars and artists long sought the tools. Arsenic, Asian flora, sulfur, mercury, and ox blood have been involved... more »

Capitalism has no serious rival. Yet its ability to deliver economic growth has been tarnished. It's time for a new, pragmatic capitalism. Paul Collier explains... more »

From Ms. magazine to Audre Lorde. Feminism, never a consensus, is an embrace of conflict, an intellectual series of fights, breaks, and ruptures... more »

Craving, exhilaration, intoxication, obsessiveness, withdrawal, helplessness: Love is like cocaine. Helen Fisher explains... more »

Moralists like Zola and Camus have given way to propagandists like Zemmour and Houellebecq. The French intellectual is dead. Long live the French intellectual... more »

Money is hardly a measure of literary value. But literary work is deeply connected to its author's financial circumstances... more »

Albert Murray's Omni-American Blues. The contrarian culture critic pursued an argument about what it means to be black ... more »

The Searle-Derrida dispute. How a narrow question about language led to accusations of ignorance and the split between analytic and continental philosophy... more »

"Tell me what you like,” said John Ruskin, “and I’ll tell you what you are.” Such was the spell he cast, people of culture didn't know what to think until he told them... more »

Jane Jacobs was a writer of caustic, lucid, vigorous prose, and an activist with a slippery political orientation... more »

Can polyamorous relationships be made boring and respectable? Carrie Jenkins makes a philosophical case for multiple loves... more »

Think tanks are modern, but they can be traced to the humanist academies of the 17th century. They've always been caught between political interests and the common good... more »

Descent of a discipline. Once philosophers appeared on TV and guided heads of state. Now they write journal articles for one another... more »

Herbert Hoover and his wife translated a 16th-century text on the “nature of subterranean things.” Inside a strange saga of politics and philosophy... more »

Daniel Kahneman likened his relationship with Amos Tversky to a marriage. It was among the most successful marriage of minds in academic history. Here's how it broke up ... more »

Poets write honestly about everything. Everything except money -- and their lack of it. What explains the taboo?... more »

Camus and Sartre smoked together, womanized together, talked shop. Newspapers covered their every move. They were inseparable. Then Sartre read The Rebel... more »

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